Philosophy of Mind in the 19th Century

Philosophy of Mind in the 19th Century

Meeting of the Canadian Philosophical Association

30 May 2016, 9:00-12:30

University of Calgary

 

The Symposium aims at documenting the fabulous richness that characterizes the study of mind over the period that extends from the publication of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason (1781) to that of Husserl’s Ideas (1913). Contributions are highlights from the eponymous project* that has three main purposes: (1) to sketch a theoretical landscape that reflects the methodological and theoretical pluralism that is characteristic of this period; (2) to draw attention to the common historical origins of psychology and philosophy of mind including cognitive sciences as we know them today; (3) to do justice to the theories of lesser known figures or of philosophers whose contribution to the study of mind has otherwise been neglected.

Presentations:

Philosophy of Mind in the 19th Century: Methodological Considerations. Sandra Lapointe, McMaster University

Idealist perspectives on mental activity and content. Clinton Tolley, University of California, San Diego

Mach’s contributions to philosophy of mind. Erik Banks, Wright State University

Helmholtz on the Stability and Plasticity of Phenomenal ExperienceLydia Patton, Virginia Tech

Nietzsche on Consciousness. Mattia Ricardi, University of Porto

William James on Conceptions and Private LanguageHenry Jackman, York University

 

*Philosophy Of Mind In The Nineteenth Century, Sandra Lapointe (ed.) – Volume 5 in The History Of The Philosophy Of Mind series edited by Rebecca Copenhaver and Christopher Shields (Routledge, forthcoming)

Table of Content

00 Introduction by Sandra Lapointe, McMaster University

 01 Bernard Bolzano on Mind and Action by Sandra Lapointe, McMaster University

02 Idealist perspectives on mental activity and content by Clinton Tolley, University of California, San Diego

03 From metaphysics to psychophysics: Herbart and the sovereign realm of presentations by Wolfgang Huemer, University of Parma and Christoph Landerer, independent scholar

04 Hermann von Helmholtz’s Theories of Sound and Color by Lydia Patton, Virginia Tech

05 Mach’s Philosophy of Mind: Sensations and Neutral Monism by Eric Banks, Wright State University

06 Nietzsche’s philosophical psychology by Mattia Riccardi, University of Porto

07 Conceptual pessimism and James’s Philosophy of Mind by Henry Jackman, York University

08 Freud’s Neurology: Surpassing 19th Century Philosophy of Mind by Bettina Bergo, University of Montreal

09 Brentano’s Philosophy of Mind  by Robin Rollinger, Czech Academy of Science

10 Mind in Meinong  by Peter Simons, Trinity College, Dublin

11 Stumpf on Joint Presentation by Mark Textor, King’s College London

12 Christian von Ehrenfels on the Mind and its Metaphysics by Carlo Ierna, Utrecht University

13 Husserl: From Intentionality to Transcendental Phenomenology  by Paul Livingston, University of New Mexico

14 Natorp’s Philosophy of Mind by Alan Kim, Stony Brook University